Are you qualified to train with us?

The Fortress student is rare and unique individual with superior character. Most citizens of our nation, although good and productive people, are for a variety of reasons, not capable of attending our courses. However, there are a number of specifics that absolutely disqualify you from attending.

They are as follows:

1. You have been convicted of a violent felony*.
2. You have been convicted of domestic violence**.
3. You have been diagnosed with mental illness that bars you from possessing firearms.
4. You are attending our course to learn skills that you plan on using for unlawful purposes, e.g. Robbery, kidnapping, insurrection, murder, treason, assassination, gang activity, terrorism, etc…
5. You are currently an alcohol and/or drug abuser.
6. You have in the past, or are now, entertaining suicidal thoughts.

If you fall into any of those categories you are disqualified from attendance.

 

If any of the following describes you, we’re not the trainers for you:

1- You prefer to be a victim rather than a victor.
2- You’re attending on a whim and have no real interest in the information we’re providing.
3- You shy away from strenuous effort and would rather have others do your work for you.
4- You like to complain and whine.
5- You think your problems are the fault of others.
6- You shun personal responsibility.
7- You are resistant to learning.
8- Your plan is to walk on the range and teach us how to shoot.
9- You’re a genuinely BAD person.

If you approach life with any of the above attitudes, if any of the above applies, you will not enjoy our classes. Please don’t waste our collective time.

Lastly, the following is not a deal breaker, but we are cautious about your attendance, as you should be, too:

1- You’re currently taking psychotropic prescription drugs or anti-depressants.

Use of such medications, again, are not necessarily a disqualifying criterion, but your need for such drugs indicates potential psychological issues that might not be compatible with firearms ownership, daily carry of firearms, or the mental, spiritual, and physical aftermath of a self-defense shooting. We are not doctors, and it is not our job (or business) to have opinions about your personal diagnosis or treatment. However, we would suggest you discuss this subject with your physician before attending a class. If you’re in doubt, please don’t sign up.

*A violent felony is defined as “any crime punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year that (i) has as an element of the use, attempted use, or threatened use of physical force against the person of another; or (ii) is burglary, arson, or extortion, involves use of explosives, or otherwise involves conduct that presents a serious potential risk of physical injury to another.” United States v. Thrower, 2009 U.S. App. LEXIS 22484, 4-5 (2d Cir. N.Y. Oct. 14, 2009)

**Domestic violence refers to violent acts committed by a family or household member against another, such as child abuse or the mistreatment of one’s spouse. Domestic violence can refer to physical harm inflicted on a member of a household or family, by another member of the same household or family.